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Cosmic view of a Cryptic Planet

(1 customer review)

This book has 16 short stories.

The stories are narrated by spirits who live in the highest place with the supreme being.

Those spirits have lived in this Earth before. They are narrating their stories.

( Yeah sab aatmayen ab antriksh men rahte Hain. Paramatma ke saath. Kabhi Prithvilok pe rahte the.

Yahan ka anubhav aur ghatnayen bata rahe Hain.

Unki experience, kahani ke zariye)

Unke liye Prithvilok ab ek adbhut jagah hai.

Baaki Brahmaand – Universe- samanya hai.

240

SKU: N169 Category:

This book has 16 short stories.

The stories are narrated by spirits who live in the highest place with the supreme being.

Those spirits have lived in this Earth before. They are narrating their stories.

( Yeah sab aatmayen ab antriksh men rahte Hain. Paramatma ke saath. Kabhi Prithvilok pe rahte the.

Yahan ka anubhav aur ghatnayen bata rahe Hain.

Unki experience, kahani ke zariye)

Unke liye Prithvilok ab ek adbhut jagah hai.

Baaki Brahmaand – Universe- samanya hai.

1 review for Cosmic view of a Cryptic Planet

  1. Manika Sharma

    If we look at our problems from the outside, we perceive things differently, and more often, we see the bigger picture. Cosmic View of a Cryptic Planet is all about it. This book is more of a guide to sit with ourselves and urges us to process our belief system again.
    The writer has a tricky way to explore the double standards that dominate society, and how damaging it is to the whole community is unfathomable.
    The stuff that is no less of a taboo in society is discussed so subtly that it challenges its “shame-based” beliefs.
    The authoress helps you look at things from a different perspective; no wonder the title justifies the prose so well. This book conveys how we have grown to be so indulgent, and nothing seems to satiate us that we have dared to exploit everything that was once not within our reach.
    We act like a demon, and yet we ask God to be benign. We may be a womanizer but want our daughter to have a happily ever after. This book also questions the people who were once supposed to serve humanity and how they use God’s name to attract fame and money.
    Besides this, it has a tender view of our lives and how we humans are bound for hope. Sometimes, we give in, but sometimes, we swerve our paths. Lucky is the one who moves on, the one who stops pining to recreate the memories of the past. Not to say, history is not good to hold onto, but it’s better to create something meaningful out of it than indulge in self-sabotage. Life is a funny thing; once we are strangers, sooner, we get attached, and later, it’s all indifference.
    The only way to sum it up is if Alanis Morrisette ever starts story-writing, it’d sound similar to this great piece.

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